Hour of Code

The Hour of Code is coming, December 7-13, 2015!

Sign up here

Because of your students and your stories, the Hour of Code movement keeps changing the world. Are you ready to do it again? Join to make this year a turning point for computer science in our schools.

Together, we can reach 100,000 Hour of Code events around the world in December. Be one of the organizers who proves anybody can learn, and every young person deserves to learn how to build technology that will impact everything in their futures.

Every participating organizer will receive a thank-you gift and you can win $10,000 for your school. Sign up now to hear about more prizes and new Hour of Code tutorials coming soon — some of our most exciting to date!

 

Summer Rejuvenation Guide

Check out this Summer Rejuvenation Guide (PDF) from Edutopia. Here are 10 tips to get the most out of your summer.

  1. Grow Your Network
  2. Party with the Stars
  3. Do-It-Yourself Professional Development
  4. Tell the Story of Your Life
  5. Try Something New
  6. Curate Classroom Artifacts
  7. Give a Little, Get a Lot
  8. Get Moving
  9. Crack the Books
  10. Plan Ahead for Next Summer

Professional Learning for Everyone

Zac Chase recently wrote a blog post detailing a project he started in the St. Vrain Valley school district creating online learning modules. The great thing is that six of the modules are available for download and installation on Moodle! I’ve downloaded them and will install them on the PPS instance of Moodle and tweak them them accordingly to fit with our district. I love that St. Vrain has shared these resources openly and that any teacher can create them. I also like the format they are following for the modules: Overview, Investigation, Application & Discussions and Further Investigation. I plan to try and create other modules using this format and will openly share those as I finish them.

5 Links, Connected Educator Month

As November begins and Connected Educator Month ends, I’d like to share the following five links for tools that help me stay connected and are part of my social media workflow.

  1. Twitter
    This is the one tool that has transformed my professional learning and helped me build my personal and professional learning networks. I have made valuable global and local connections to other educators and teachers that I would never have met otherwise. It’s my go-to resource for professional reading and links to other technology-related resources
  2. Instagram
    This photo sharing site is another of my favorite social networking tools. I love being able to see stories that friends and strangers tell through images. Exploring what people post is a constant inspiration to me and makes me want to become a better photographer.
  3. Evernote
    I started using this tool regularly during the last year. It’s an amazing note-taking tool that is accessible from all platforms. I end up storing more than just notes here; I use it to back up my photos and save anything I want to remember, like book titles, specific products, etc. Text within photos is also searchable!
  4. Pinboard & Delicious
    These are social bookmarking tools that I use on a daily basis. All my tweets are automatically saved into both of these services. I also like that I can search for a particular tag and see what others have bookmarked or look up specific users, see what they’re bookmarking and subscribe to their feeds if I want.
  5. IFTTT
    This fantastic automation tool is responsible for most of my social media workflow. You create recipes that put the internet to work for you. This is the tool I use to do cross-posting and sharing to other sites. For example, when I favorite a tweet, it goes straight to Pinboard and Delicious as a bookmark.

I love being able to use social media to connect with others and share what I am doing. I have found it to be invaluable in my professional and personal lives. The key is to start small and share what seems appropriate and comfortable to you. Once you have mastered using one tool, you can continue to focus on that tool or add another to explore.

5 Links, Sept. 9, 2013

Since the September EdTech Challenge focuses on Mystery Skype, I thought the five links I shared today would be related. Mystery Skype is an educational game, invented by teachers, played by two classrooms on Skype. The aim of the game is to guess the location of the other classroom by asking each other questions. It’s suitable for all age groups and can be used to teach subjects like geography, history, languages, mathematics and science. Check out the five links below.

10 Ways to Start Using Skype in the Classroom
A list of 10 simple ideas for getting started with Skype.

Assessment of Learning via Skype
Great pre- and post-assessment activities with files you can download for use from Silvia Tolisano.

Comprehensive Guide to Using Skype in the Classroom

So You Want to do Mystery Skype?
Good to do list of steps to get started from Pernille Ripp.

The Official Mystery Skype Community from Skype
You can sign up here to do Mystery Skype if you can’t participate in the September Challenge.